free microsoft office alternative for windows 10 increase fantashic courage of the pure of heart and to strike fear into the hearts of the impure. The Short-Snout has fewer human killings to its name than most dragons, though as it prefers to live in wild and uninhabited mountainous areas, this is not much to its credit.">

fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free

fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free

Loved by fans around the world, the series has sold over million copies, been translated into over 80 languages, and made into eight blockbuster films OverDrive uses cookies and similar technologies to improve your experience, monitor our performance, and understand overall usage trends for OverDrive services including OverDrive websites and apps. We use this information to create a better experience for all users.

Please review the types of cookies we use below. These cookies allow you to explore OverDrive services and use our core features. Without these cookies, we can't provide services to you. These cookies allow us to monitor OverDrive's performance and reliability.

They alert us when OverDrive services are not working as expected. Without these cookies, we won't know if you have any performance-related issues that we may be able to address. These cookies help us understand user behavior within our services. For example, they let us know which features and sections are most popular. Fantastic Beasts written by J.

In other words, the book contains information on magical creatures. The title is quite self-explanatory, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them contains 85 different magical creature species located worldwide. Scamander compiled this fantastic list of animals through his continuous travel over the five continents. To wizards, I say merely: Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus.

I look back across the years to the seven-year-old wizard who spent hours in his bedroom dismembering Horklumps and I envy him the journeys to come: from darkest jungle to brightest desert, from mountain peak to marshy bog, that grubby Horklump-encrusted boy would track, as he grew up, the beasts described in the following pages. I have visited lairs, burrows, and nests across five continents, observed the curious habits of magical beasts in a hundred countries, witnessed their powers, gained their trust and, on occasion, beaten them off with my travelling kettle.

The first edition of Fantastic Beasts was commissioned back in by Mr. Augustus Worme of Obscurus Books, who was kind enough to ask me whether I would consider writing an authoritative compendium of magical creatures for his publishing house. I was then but a lowly Ministry of Magic employee and leapt at the chance both to augment my pitiful salary of two Sickles a week and to spend my holidays travelling the globe in search of new magical species. The rest is publishing history: Fantastic Beasts is now in its fifty-second edition.

This introduction is intended to answer a few of the most frequently asked questions that have been arriving in my weekly postbag ever since this book was first published in Though this might surprise some first-time students of Magizoology, the problem might come into clearer focus if we take a moment to consider three types of magical creature.

Werewolves spend most of their time as humans whether wizard or Muggle. Once a month, however, they transform into savage, four-legged beasts of murderous intent and no human conscience. Trolls bear a humanoid appearance, walk upright, may be taught a few simple words, and yet are less intelligent than the dullest unicorn, and possess no magical powers in their own right except for their prodigious and unnatural strength. The meeting hall was crammed with goblins who had brought with them as many two-legged creatures as they could find.

As Bathilda Bagshot tells us in A History of Magic: Little could be heard over the squawking of the Diricawls, the moaning of the Augureys, and the relentless, piercing song of the Fwoopers. As wizards and witches attempted to consult the papers before them, sundry pixies and fairies whirled around their heads, giggling and jabbering. A dozen or so trolls began to smash apart the chamber with their clubs, while hags glided about the place in search of children to eat.

The Council Chief stood up to open the meeting, slipped on a pile of Porlock dung and ran cursing from the hall. As we see, the mere possession of two legs was no guarantee that a magical creature could or would take an interest in the affairs of wizard government.

Once again, however, there were problems. Trolls who had been taught a few simple sentences by the goblins proceeded to destroy the hall as before. Not until were definitions found that most of the magical community found acceptable. Acromantulas and Manticores are capable of intelligent speech but will attempt to devour any human that goes near them.

The sphinx talks only in puzzles and riddles, and is violent when given the wrong answer. Wherever there is continued uncertainty about the classification of a beast in the following pages, I have noted it in the entry for that creature. A year later the merpeople made the same request. The Ministry of Magic accepted their demands reluctantly. A glance through Muggle art and literature of the Middle Ages reveals that many of the creatures they now believe to be imaginary were then known to be real.

The dragon, the griffin, the unicorn, the phoenix, the centaur — these and more are represented in Muggle works of that period, though usually with almost comical inexactitude. However, a closer examination of Muggle bestiaries of that period demonstrates that most magical beasts either escaped Muggle notice completely or were mistaken for something else. Examine this surviving fragment of manuscript, written by one Brother Benedict, a Franciscan monk from Worcestershire: Todaye while travailing in the Herbe Garden, I did push aside the basil to discover a Ferret of monstrous size.

As my nose was still swollen and bloody I was excused Vespers. Muggle persecution of wizards at this time was reaching a pitch hitherto unknown and sightings of such beasts as dragons and Hippogriffs were contributing to Muggle hysteria. The International Confederation ofWizards argued the matter out at their famous summit meeting of No fewer than seven weeks of sometimes acrimonious discussion between wizards of all nationalities were devoted to the troublesome question of magical creatures.

How many species would we be able to conceal from Muggle notice and which should they be? Where and how should we hide them? The debate raged on, some creatures oblivious to the fact that their destiny was being decided, others contributing to the debate. This number was increased over the following century, as wizards became more confident in their methods of concealment.

Magical Beasts in Hiding I t would be idle to deny that there have been occasional breaches of Clause 73 since it was first put in place. Older British readers will remember the Ilfracombe Incident of , when a rogue Welsh Green dragon swooped down upon a crowded beach full of sunbathing Muggles. Fatalities were mercifully prevented by the brave actions of a holidaying wizarding family subsequendy awarded Orders of Merlin, First Class , when they immediately performed the largest batch of Memory Charms this century on the inhabitants of Ilfracombe, thus narrowly averting catastrophe.

Tibet and Scotland are two of the most persistent offenders. Muggle sightings of the yeti have been so numerous that the International Confederation of Wizards felt it necessary to station an International Task Force in the mountains on a permanent basis. These unfortunate mishaps notwithstanding, we wizards may congratulate ourselves on a job well done. There can be no doubt that the overwhelming majority of present-day Muggles refuse to believe in the magical beasts their ancestors so feared.

Even those Muggles who do notice Porlock droppings or Streeler trails — it would be foolish to suppose that all traces of these creatures can be hidden — appear satisfied with the flimsiest non-magical explanation.

So how does the wizarding community hide fantastic beasts? Luckily, some species do not require much wizarding assistance in avoiding the notice of Muggles. Then there are those beasts that, due to cleverness or innate shyness, avoid contact with Muggles at all costs — for instance, the unicorn, the Mooncalf, and the centaur.

Other magical creatures inhabit places inaccessible to Muggles — one thinks of the Acromantula, deep in the uncharted jungle of Borneo, and the phoenix, nesting high on mountain peaks unreachable without the use of magic. Nevertheless there are still plenty of beasts that, whether willfully or inadvertently, remain conspicuous even to the Muggle eye, and it is these that create a significant amount of work for the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures.

This department, the second largest at the Ministry of Magic,9 deals with the varying needs of the many species under its care in a variety of different ways. Safe Habitats Perhaps the most important step in the concealment of magical creatures is the creation of safe habitats. Muggle-Repelling Charms prevent trespassers into the forests where centaurs and unicorns live, and on the lakes and rivers set aside for the use of 9 The largest department at the Ministry of Magic is the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, to which the remaining six departments are all, in some respect, answerable — with the possible exception of the Department of Mysteries.

In extreme cases, such as that of the Quintaped, whole areas have been made unplottable. While unicorns and merpeople are only too happy to stay within the territories designated for their use, dragons will seek any opportunity to set forth in search of prey beyond the reservation borders. Cases in point are the kelpie, whose sole aim in life is to attract humans towards it, and the Pogrebin, which seeks out humans for itself. Controls on Selling and Breeding The possibility of a Muggle being alarmed by any of the larger or more dangerous magical beasts has been greatly reduced by the severe penalties now attached to their breeding and the sale of their young and eggs.

The Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures keeps a strict watch on the trade in fantastic beasts. The Ban on Experimental Breeding has made the creation of new species illegal.

Disillusionment Charms The wizard on the street also plays a part in the concealment of magical beasts. Those who own a Hippogriff, for example, are bound by law to enchant the beast with a Disillusionment Charm to distort the vision of any Muggle who may see it.

Disillusionment Charms should be performed daily, as their effects are apt to wear off. The Memory Charm may be performed by the owner of the beast in question, but in severe cases of Muggle notice, a team of trained Obliviators may be sent in by the Ministry of Magic.

The Office of Misinformation The Office of Misinformation will become involved in only the very worst magical-Muggle collisions. Some magical catastrophes or accidents are simply too glaringly obvious to be explained away by Muggles without the help of an outside authority.

The Office of Misinformation will in such a case liaise directly with the Muggle prime minister to seek a plausible non-magical explanation for the event. The unstinting efforts of this office in persuading Muggles that all photographic evidence of the Loch Ness kelpie is fake have gone some way to salvaging a situation that at one time looked exceedingly dangerous. Why Magizoology Matters T he measures described above merely hint at the full scope and extent of the work done by the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures.

It remains only to answer that question to which we all, in our hearts, know the answer: Why do we continue, as a community and as individuals, to attempt to protect and conceal magical beasts, even those that are savage and untameable?

I offer this work as a mere introduction to the wealth of fantastic beasts that inhabit our world. Seventy-five species are described in the following pages, but I do not doubt that some time this year yet another will be discovered, necessitating a fifty- third revised edition of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. In the meantime I will merely add that it affords me great pleasure to think that generations of young witches and wizards have grown to a fuller knowledge and understanding of the fantastic beasts I love through the pages of this book.

These offer an at-a-glance guide to the perceived dangerousness of a creature. The five categories are as follows: Ministry of Magic M. It originated in Borneo, where it inhabits dense jungle. Its distinctive features include the thick black hair that covers its body; its legspan, which may reach up to fifteen feet; its pincers, which produce a distinctive clicking sound when the Acromantula is excited or angry; and a poisonous secretion.

The Acromantula is carnivorous and prefers large prey. It spins dome- shaped webs upon the ground. The female is bigger than the male and may lay up to one hundred eggs at a time. Soft and white, these are as large as beach balls. The young hatch in six to eight weeks. Acromantula eggs are defined as Class A Non- Tradeable Goods by the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures, meaning that severe penalties are attached to their importation or sale. This beast is believed to be wizard-bred, possibly intended to guard wizard dwellings or treasure, as is often the case with magically created monsters.

The Ban on Experimental Breeding did not come into effect until this century, long after the first recorded sighting of an Acromantula in Rumours that a colony of Acromantula has been established in Scotland are unconfirmed. Ashwinder M. Classification: XXX The Ashwinder is created when a magical fire2 is allowed to burn unchecked for too long. A thin, pale-grey serpent with glowing red eyes, it will rise from the embers of an unsupervised fire and slither away into the shadows of the dwelling in which it finds itself, leaving an ashy trail behind it.

The Ashwinder lives for only an hour and during that time seeks a dark and secluded spot in which to lay its eggs, after which it will collapse into dust.

Ashwinder eggs are brilliant red and give off intense heat. They will ignite the dwelling within minutes if not found and frozen with a suitable charm. Any wizard realising that one or more Ashwinders are loose in the house must trace them immediately and locate the nest of eggs.

Once frozen, these eggs are of great value for use in Love Potions and may be eaten whole as a cure for ague. Ashwinders are found worldwide. Augurey also known as Irish Phoenix M. A thin and mournful- looking bird, somewhat like a small and underfed vulture in 2 Any fire to which a magical substance such as Floo powder has been added. It is intensely shy, nests in bramble and thorn, eats large insects and fairies, flies only in heavy rain, and otherwise remains hidden in its tear-shaped nest.

The Augurey has a distinctive low and throbbing cry, which was once believed to foretell death. Wizards avoided Augurey nests for fear of hearing that heart-rending sound, and more than one wizard is believed to have suffered a heart attack on passing a thicket and hearing an unseen Augurey wail. Augurey feathers are useless as quills because they repel ink.

Basilisk also known as the King of Serpents M. Classification: XXXXX The first recorded Basilisk was bred by Herpo the Foul, a Greek Dark wizard and Parselmouth, who discovered after much experimentation that a chicken egg hatched beneath a toad would produce a gigantic serpent possessed of extraordinarily dangerous powers.

The Basilisk is a brilliant green serpent that may reach up to fifty feet in length. The male has a scarlet plume upon its head. It has exceptionally venomous fangs but its most dangerous means 3 Uric the Oddball is known to have slept in a room containing no fewer than fifty pet Augureys.

During one particularly wet winter, Uric became convinced by the moaning of his Augureys that he had died and was now a ghost. Anyone looking directly into these will suffer instant death. If the food source is sufficient the Basilisk will eat all mammals and birds and most reptiles , the serpent may attain a very great age.

The creation of Basilisks has been illegal since medieval times, although the practice is easily concealed by simply removing the chicken egg from beneath the toad when the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures comes to call. However, since Basilisks are uncontrollable except by Parselmouths, they are as dangerous to most Dark wizards as to anybody else, and there have been no recorded sightings of Basilisks in Britain for at least four hundred years.

Billywig M. It is around half an inch long and a vivid sapphire blue, although its speed is such that it is rarely noticed by Muggles and often not by wizards until they have been stung. At the bottom of the body is a long thin sting. Those who have been stung by a Billywig suffer giddiness followed by levitation. Dried Billywig stings are used in several potions and are believed to be a component in the popular sweet Fizzing Whizbees.

Bowtruckle M. Classification: XX The Bowtruckle is a tree-guardian creature found mainly in the west of England, southern Germany, and certain Scandinavian forests. It is immensely difficult to spot, being small maximum eight inches in height and apparently made of bark and twigs with two small brown eyes. The Bowtruckle, which eats insects, is a peaceable and intensely shy creature but if the tree in which it lives is threatened, it has been known to leap down upon the woodcutter or tree-surgeon attempting to harm its home and gouge at their eyes with its long, sharp fingers.

An offering of woodlice will placate the Bowtruckle long enough to let a witch or wizard remove wand-wood from its tree. Bundimun M. Classification: XXX Bundimuns are found worldwide. Skilled at creeping under floorboards and behind skirting boards, they infest houses.

The presence of a Bundimun is usually announced by a foul stench of decay. The Bundimun oozes a secretion which rots away the very foundations of the dwelling in which it is found. It feeds on dirt. Scouring charms will rid a house of an infestation of Bundimuns, though if they have been allowed to grow too large, the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures Pest Sub-Division should be contacted before the house collapses.

Diluted Bundimun secretion is used in certain magical cleaning fluids. Centaur M. Being intelligent and capable of speech, it should not strictly speaking be termed a beast, but by its own request it has been classified as such by the Ministry of Magic see the Introduction to this book.

The centaur is forest-dwelling. Centaurs are believed to have originated in Greece, though there are now centaur communities in many parts of Europe. Wizarding authorities in each of the countries where centaurs are found have allocated areas where the centaurs will not be troubled by Muggles; however, centaurs stand in little need of wizard protection, having their own means of hiding from humans.

The ways of the centaur are shrouded in mystery. They are generally speaking as mistrustful of wizards as they are of Muggles and indeed seem to make little differentiation between us.

They five in herds ranging in size from ten to fifty members. They are reputed to be well-versed in magical healing, divination, archery, and astronomy. The same applies to merpeople and unicorns. Vicious and bloodthirsty, the Chimaera is extremely dangerous.

There is only one known instance of the successful slaying of a Chimaera and the unlucky wizard concerned fell to his death from his winged horse see page 42 shortly afterwards, exhausted by his efforts. Chizpurfle M. Classification: XX Chizpurfles are small parasites up to a twentieth of an inch high, crablike in appearance, with large fangs. They are attracted by magic and may infest the fur and feathers of such creatures as Crups and Augureys. They will also enter wizard dwellings and attack magical objects such as wands, gradually gnawing their way through to the magical core, or else settle in dirty cauldrons, where they will gorge upon any lingering drops of potion.

Chizpurfle infestations explain the puzzling failure of many relatively new Muggle electrical artifacts. Classification: XX The Clabbert is a tree-dwelling creature, in appearance something like a cross between a monkey and a frog.

It originated in the southern states of America, though it has since been exported worldwide. The smooth and hairless skin is a mottled green, the hands and feet are webbed, and the arms and legs are long and supple, enabling the Clabbert to swing between branches with the agility of an orangutan. The head has short horns, and the wide mouth, which appears to be grinning, is full of razor-sharp teeth. The Clabbert feeds mostly on small lizards and birds.

American wizards once kept Clabberts in their gardens to give early warning of approaching Muggles, but the International Confederation of Wizards has introduced fines which have largely ended this practice. The sight of a tree at night full of glowing Clabbert pustules, while decorative, attracted too many Muggles wishing to ask why their neighbours still had their Christmas lights up in June.

Crup M. It closely resembles a Jack Russell terrier, except for the forked tail. The Crup is almost certainly a wizard-created dog, as it is intensely loyal to wizards and ferocious towards Muggles. It is a great scavenger, eating anything from gnomes to old tyres. Demiguise M. Classification: XXXX The Demiguise is found in the Far East, though only with great difficulty, for this beast is able to make itself invisible when threatened, and can be seen only by wizards skilled in its capture.

The Demiguise is a peaceful herbivorous beast, something like a graceful ape in appearance, with large, black, doleful eyes more often than not hidden by its hair. The whole body is covered with long, fine, silky, silvery hair. Demiguise pelts are highly valued as the hair may be spun into Invisibility Cloaks. Diricawl M. A plump-bodied, fluffy- feathered, flightless bird, the Diricawl is remarkable for its method of escaping danger.

It can vanish in a puff of feathers and reappear elsewhere the phoenix shares this ability; see page Doxy sometimes known as Biting Fairy M. Classification: XXX The Doxy is often mistaken for a fairy see page 16 though it is a quite separate species. Doxies are found throughout northern Europe and America, preferring cold climates.

They lay up to five hundred eggs at a time and bury them. The eggs hatch in two to three weeks. Doxies have double rows of sharp, venomous teeth. An antidote should be taken if bitten. Dragon M. The female is generally larger and more aggressive than the male, though neither should be approached by any but highly skilled and trained wizards. Dragon hide, blood, heart, liver, and horn all have highly magical properties, but dragon eggs are defined as Class A Non-Tradeable Goods.

Pure-bred dragons are as follows: Antipodean Opaleye The Opaleye is a native of New Zealand, though it has been known to migrate to Australia when territory becomes scarce in its native land.

Unusually for a dragon, it dwells in valleys rather than mountains. It is of medium size between two and three tonnes. Perhaps the most beautiful type of dragon, it has iridescent, pearly scales and glittering, multi-coloured, pupil-less eyes, hence its name. This dragon produces a very vivid scarlet flame, though by dragon standards it is not particularly aggressive and will rarely kill unless hungry.

Its favourite food is sheep, though it has been known to attack larger prey. A spate of kangaroo killings in the late s were attributed to a male Opaleye ousted from his homeland by a dominant female. Opaleye eggs are pale grey and may be mistaken for fossils by unwary Muggles.

Chinese Fireball sometimes known as Liondragon The only Oriental dragon has a particularly striking appearance. Scarlet and smooth-scaled, it has a fringe of golden spikes around its snub-snouted face and extremely protuberant eyes. The Fireball gained its name for the mushroom-shaped flame that bursts from its nostrils when it is angered. It weighs between two and four tonnes, the female being larger than the male.

Fantastic Beasts written by J. In other words, the book contains information on magical creatures. The title is quite self-explanatory, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them contains 85 different magical creature species located worldwide. Scamander compiled this fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free list of animals through his continuous travel over the five continents. In Harry Potter, this book is required for first-year Hogwarts students. Update The first Fantastic Beasts book to movie adaptation was released November ! The second novel, Fantastic Beasts The Crimes of Grindelwald will be released almost exactly 2 years later on November The second book IMDB info. To wizards, I say merely: Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus. Speaking of Free piano software for usb keyboard Potter and The Cursed Child, read our short summary for more info on the last book in the series. Thank you! If you are interetsed in the screen play for the upcoming movie it will be available fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free released below from Amazon. Fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free Name required. Your Email required. fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free Eligible Prime members can borrow prime eligible Harry Potter Kindle books for free, directly from a Kindle device (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts I & II​. FANTASTIC BEASTS and where to find them NEWT SCAMANDER Special binders, and booksellers, contributed their time, energy and materials free or at a​. Read Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them eBook onlie. The book is wrote by J. K. Rowling. However, when his magical case is misplaced and some of Newt's fantastic beasts escape, cover image of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. Read A Sample. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. The Original Screenplay · Harry Potter. by J. K. Rowling. ebook Learn how to read digital books for free. Find. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: The Original Screenplay ebook by Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald - The Original Screenplay ebook by​. Read "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" by J.K. Rowling available from Rakuten Kobo. The edition of this essential companion. In other words, the book contains information on magical creatures. The title is quite self-explanatory, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. - A fantastic addition to the Harry Potter universe. The Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them screenplay welcomes you to a new era of magic. Set in the s. Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them is an indispensable introduction to the magical beasts of the wizarding world. Dip in to discover the curious habits of magical beasts across five continents. Fantastic Beasts eBook – Pottermore. fantastic beasts and where to find them: the original screenplay pdf free. Goodreads Librari Community Reviews. For me one of the elements that make me fall in love easily into a fiction book is how realistic it can be. I wanted this to be my first experience with this branch of HP or the Wizarding World. I give it a three for she I guess I expected something a little more. New here? Wizard and Witches lives deep in London, across the UK and even all over the world. DMCA and Copyright : The book is not hosted on our servers, to remove the file please contact the source url. I give it a three for sheer nostalgia. And of course, also, during the course of the ministry, even detailing how complicated and polemic became to classify certain creatures easily seen as beings instead of beasts. Stream in HD. Okay, so now you want to know what they're really made from. I will definitely recommend this book to young adult, fiction lovers. Well, yeah, this is supposed to be a Hogwarts text book. fantastic beasts and where to find them ebook free